Strike - Hold!

THE blog for milsim and real-deal airborne and special operations forces - units, gear, training, history and more...

Friday Foto

An Airman from the 22nd Special Tactics Squadron’s Red Team jumps out of an MH-47 Chinook helicopter July 14, 2014, during helocast alternate insertion and extraction training with Soldiers from the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment at American Lake on Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington. Helocasting is an airborne technique used by special operations forces units for amphibious insertion into a military area of operation.  (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt.Russ Jackson)

An Airman from the 22nd Special Tactics Squadron’s Red Team jumps out of an MH-47 Chinook helicopter July 14, 2014, during helocast alternate insertion and extraction training with Soldiers from the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment at American Lake on Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington. Helocasting is an airborne technique used by special operations forces units for amphibious insertion into a military area of operation.

(U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt.Russ Jackson)

“Scorpion” Aimed At Unique Air Combat Niche

Bill Sweetman of Aviation Week has taken a closer look at this interesting new player on the aerospace market:

“In person, the Scorpion is quite big. At 21,250 lb. max takeoff weight, it is about the size of the M-346 or a Citation Excel, it carries a 9,300 lb. useful load, and it stands well clear of the ground. As a jet, it offers much greater speed and altitude capability than a King Air or AT-6, Anderson points out.

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Now that Textron owns both those aircraft, the Scorpion is not intended to compete with them. Or anything else, for that matter. The Scorpion costs more than its propeller-driven cousins but much less than a fighter: The goals were a $20 million acquisition cost and $3,000 per flight hour. Its niche is to do missions for which air forces today use fighters because that’s what they have, but where the fighter’s expensively acquired air-combat prowess and survivability are unused.”

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D3O gets Royal recognition

D3O, the British smart materials specialist, has been honoured by Her Majesty the Queen at a Buckingham Palace reception. The company attended the celebration for winners of Queen’s Awards, because of delivering six years of strong performance in international trade.

D3O was named as a winner of a Queen’s Award for Enterprise in April after demonstrating growth both in absolute sales, and in the percentage it exports: an increase from 62% in 2007 to 88% in 2013. The result of the unprecedented growth and strong export sales – which grew 34% in 2013 alone – is that this year the company will see revenues of £8.5m.

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The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh hosted a special reception at the palace for 2014 Queen’s Award for Enterprise winners, and Stuart Sawyer, D3O’s Chief Executive Officer and Phil Sheriff, the Materials Development Manager were invited to represent the company.

The Over Exaggerated “C” Clamp Grip…Hype or Not?

Another great article – this time from Nick Irving over at “The Loadout Room”.

Chris-Costa

Read it here.

Another Way To Fight: Unconventional Warfare from Rome to Iran

(Hat tip to Jack Murphy for bringing this very good article to my attention.)

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” Foreign Intrigue is pleased to provide an article from Guest Contributor Dave Coughran that was previously posted at the Harvard Kennedy School Review. The article examines unconventional warfare.

Dave is a 2014 Master in Public Policy candidate at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, currently studying diplomacy and international affairs. Coughran completed two tours to Iraq as a Green Beret in the Special Forces. He speaks Arabic and has served in numerous advisory posts to militaries and governments from the Middle East.”

Read it here.

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