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From The Archives: “Special Forces” The Big Picture 1962

“Distinguished motion picture, stage, and television star, Mr. Henry Fonda, is the host-narrator for this issue of THE BIG PICTURE – which turns its attention to the soldiers of the Special Forces.”

“From the rigorous, demanding training at the Special Warfare Center, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, to an exciting Special Forces Training Mission high in the Bavarian Alps, THE BIG PICTURE audiences will find this release timely, entertaining and informative!”

The film looks in particular at the 10th Special Forces Group.  The 10th Special Forces Group is responsible for operations within the EUCOM area of responsibility, as part of the Special Operations Command, Europe (SOCEUR), as well as parts of Africa and the Middle East.  10th SFG was formed on 19 June 1952, at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, under the command of Colonel Aaron Bank. The Group was split in 1953, with one half being sent to Germany, while the other half remained at Fort Bragg to form the core of the 77th Special Forces Group.

In 1968, the majority of the unit transferred to Fort Devens, Massachusetts, with the exception of 1st Battalion, which remained in Germany. Between 1994 and 1995, 10th SFG moved to Fort Carson, Colorado, which remains its current home.

10th Special Forces Group began training with unconventional warfare groups from friendly countries in the 1960s, beginning with NATO allies. The Group has also trained various components of the militaries of several Middle Eastern countries, including Lebanon, Jordan, Yemen, Iran, as well as Kurdish tribesmen. Units of the 10th SFG have participated in humanitarian missions to the Congo, Somalia, and Rwanda. 10th SFG was deployed to Saudi Arabia in 1991 during the First Persian Gulf War. The 10th SFG has been heavily involved in the War on Terrorism, deploying to Georgia, North, West, and Central Africa, Afghanistan, and to Iraq.

(Hat tip to former 10th SFG member Ken G. for alerting us to the video)

Friday Foto

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4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division Paratroopers walk to a rally point after an airborne training jump onto Malemute Drop Zone at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Nov. 3, 2016.

United States Air Force photo by Justin Connaher.

Saturday Snapshot

"Rudolf the red-nosed reindeer had a very shiny nose..." SHUT UP CARL!

“Rudolf the red-nosed reindeer had a very shiny nose…”
SHUT THE FUCK UP CARL!

Paratroopers assigned to Able Company, 2D Battalion (Airborne) 503D Infantry “The Rock”, 173rd Airborne Brigade during team leader training at Tapa Training Area, Estonia, Nov. 16, 2016.

U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Lauren Harrah.

A new ‘wildcat’ cartridge for the US Military?

“The United States military has a long history of adopting so-called wildcat calibers from the civilian world. Hell, the 5.56mm round that fills every M249 belt and M16 magazine has its origins as an experimental varmint round for civilian hunters — the .222 Remington Magnum.”

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The rounds pictured above may soon be finding their way into the USSOCOM arsenal – read more about here:

http://www.wearethemighty.com/articles/special-operators-want-a-new-sniper-rifle-in-this-rare-caliber

From The Archives: U.S. Army Cold Weather and Mountain Warfare School

“Deep in the heart of the Alaskan wilderness, a picked group of soldiers climbs the rugged peaks and glaciers of the far north. These are soldiers of the United States Army attending a unique school -a tough, rough, demanding school specializing in equipping troops to live and fight under Arctic conditions.

This week THE BIG PICTURE joins a class of volunteers at the U.S. Army Cold Weather and Mountain School. Travel along with us as these soldiers learn mountaineering, rope bridge construction, and other skills in one of the world’s most hostile environments.”

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