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Category: Elite Units (page 1 of 77)

Friday Foto

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Chilean soldiers from the 1st Paratroopers Battalion and Canadian soldiers from 2e Bataillon, Royal 22e Régiment, conduct helicopter insertion rappelling from a Royal Canadian Air Force CH-146 Griffon helicopter during RIMPAC 2016 at Camp Pendleton in San Diego, California.

Copyright: www.combatcamera.forces.gc.ca

The Striker Stealth Smock from UF PRO®

The history of the ‘smock’ in military usage goes back to the Second World War when they became famously associated with the German Fallschirmjaeger, the British and Allied Airborne Forces and the British Special Air Service.

denison smock IWMWWII-era British Airborne Force ‘Denison Smock’, from the Imperial War Museum’s collection. © IWM (UNI 11787)

Continuing to be inherently associated with Airborne and Special Forces in the UK, Commonwealth and Western European countries, the ‘old skool’ style smock reached what was perhaps the pinnacle of its design with the famous ‘Kit Karry Smock’ from Special Air-Sea Services in the UK (see below).  However, since the start of the Global War On Terror, the kit used, carried and worn by Special Forces (and even regular grunts) has undergone a remarkable transformation – so much so that many people felt that the smock no longer had a place in the modern kit list of combat shirts and body armour / plate carriers…

sass_kitkarrysmock

But, as is so often the case, units are (re)discovering that some of the old ways were in fact the best ways.  Such is the case with the new Striker Stealth Smock from UF PRO®.  UF PRO® learned from working with European Pathfinder and other Special Units that there are occasions when you simply want to or need to travel light, and that there are also times when a combat shirt under a plate carrier simply doesn’t provide enough warmth or weather protection, and that you also sometimes want to carry secondary or sustainment items in your backpack but keep all of your essential items’ within reach of your hands…

After reviewing the current needs with a German special unit, it became clear to UF PRO® that the classic smock design couldn’t meet the desired criteria – so they would have to reinvent it, and the result is the Striker Stealth Smock.

Striker-Stealth-Pocket-Configuration Continue reading

Leapfest 2016 – International Airborne Competition

As its National Airborne Day, it seems fitting to post our wrap-up of this year’s Leapfest today – hard to believe it was already a week ago that the skies over southern Rhode Island were full of parachutes…

National Airborne Day on Aug. 16 honors the occassion of the first official parachute jump of the US Army, conducted on this date in 1940, by the volunteer Soldiers of the Parachute Test Platoon.  Other nations had already established Airborne Forces even before the US of course, including Italy, Germany, the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom and even France.  The Canadian Army established its first airborne unit in July 1942.

tumblr_mtvd5tILoU1s57vgxo4_r2_1280Red Army paratroops ‘jump’ from the wing of a Tupolev bomber in an exercise during the 1930’s.

Military parachuting has come a long way since those early experimental drops, and many lessons were also learned the hard way from the combat parachute drops during the Second World War.  Today’s Paratroops jump from turbo-prop and jet-powered aircraft as well as helicopters using either a static-line to automatically deploy their parachute, or by freefalling and then manually pulling a so-called ‘rip cord’ to deploy their ‘chute – and modern parachutes also come with non-steerable and steerable round canopies for normal operations, or highly-manueverable ‘ram-air’ square canopies for special operations.

t-11-parachute-001Current-day US Army Paratroopers jump from a C-130 using the new, cruciform-shape canopied T-11 non-steerable parachute.  The T-11 system has replaced the T-10 parachute that was in use for over 50 years.

Leapfest is the largest, longest standing, international static-line parachute competition. It is hosted each year by the 56th Troop Command of the Rhode Island Army National Guard to promote training and esprit de corps within the international airborne community.

DSCN2499The team from the Czech Republic walk off the Drop Zone after a jump.

Leapfest is both an individual and team event – each jumper must complete 2 jumps to be qualified for the individual award, and each team must complete 8 jumps in total to be qualified for the team award.  Each team consists of 5 participants: 4 jumpers and 1 alternate jumper.

DSCN2562The combined teams from the Italian Army, Navy, Air Force and Carabinieri pose for a group photo.

Jumpers exit from a CH-47 Chinook helicopter at an altitude of 1500 feet (457 meters) using an MC-6 static line deployed, steerable, parabolic parachute and aim to land as close as possible to a marked, designated ‘X-marks-the-spot’ on the Drop Zone.

DSCN2083DSCN2135 Continue reading

Friday Foto

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Snipers, Pathfinders and Reconnaissance members, from 2e Bataillon Royal 22e Régiment, conduct insertion and extraction by helicopter training with a Royal Canadian Air Force CH-147F Chinook helicopter during ‪#‎RIMPAC‬ on Camp Pendleton in San Diego, California on July 15, 2016.

Photo : Sgt Marc-André Gaudreault, Valcartier imaging services

Copyright: www.combatcamera.forces.gc.ca

Sunday Snapshot

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Picture of a group of mountain troops (‘Gebirgsjaeger’) of the West German Bundeswehr, from a 1959 issue of LIFE magazine.

Note the use of the G1 (German model FN FAL), the Bundeswehr 1956 pattern ‘Splinter’ camouflage, and the US-style ‘steel pot’ helmets.  Here’s a closer look at the M1956 Splinter Camo uniforms used in the early days of the Bundeswehr.

german_splinter_pattern_uniformPhoto source:  militaryblog.jp

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