Strike - Hold!

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Category: History (page 1 of 18)

Saturday Snapshot

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The National Sentry Program resumed its posting of sentries at the National War Memorial in Ottawa on October 24, 2014.

Photo: MCpl Patrick Blanchard, Canadian Forces Combat Camera

Operation Market-Garden +70 – The British Airborne sector

In honor of the 70th anniversary, for the past week the British Army’s 16 Air Assault Brigade’s Facebook page has been posting photographs and synopses of the fighting that the British 1st Airborne Division was involved in during Operation Market-Garden. 

We’ve been sharing those updates throughout the week on our own Facebook page, and now here they are pieced together all in one place for posterity…

18 Sept 44

 On 18th September 1944 the second wave of 1st Airborne Division landed at Arnhem under heavy fire, made of a drop by the 4th Parachute Brigade and the 2nd Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment in gliders.  The 1st and 3rd Parachute Battalions had fought their way to within 2km of the bridge in Arnhem.

Copyright: Airborne Assault Museum, Duxford

19 Sept 1944

Aerial view of Arnhem Bridge showing British positions.

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Monday Montage – Operation Market-Garden +70

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Paratroopers assigned to 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, observe the launch point of the historic World War II Waal River crossing, Sept. 16, during a staff ride in Nijmegen, Netherlands.  Paratroopers attended the staff ride, hosted by the Royal Netherlands Army, during the 70th commemoration of Operation Market Garden.

(U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Mary S. Katzenberger)

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WAAL CROSSING COMMEMORATED DURING MARKET GARDEN +70.  Paratroopers assigned to 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division recreate the famous daylight crossing of the Waal River during the hard-fought conquest of the bridge at Nijmegen.

(Royal Netherlands Army photo)

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World War II-era tanks roll past Paratroopers assigned to Company A, 2nd Battalion, 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division on the John S. Thompson Bridge in Grave, Netherlands, Sept. 17, 2014, during a reenactment of the bridge assault undertaken by the 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment in World War II during Operation Market Garden.

(U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Mary S. Katzenberger)

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Friday Foto

Gran Sasso

On this date in 1943 (12 September), a crack unit of Luftwaffe Fallschirmjaeger – with a support team of WSS Commandos – swept down upon a barren mountain plateau in Italy and snatched deposed Italian dictator Benito Mussolini away to Berlin.

To read the most in-depth and accurate account yet published of this remarkable raid, be sure to pick up Osprey Publishing’s “Rescuing Mussolini: Gran Sasso 1943” by Robert Forczyk – you can read our review of this book here.

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Swedish Army Para Rangers – Op Normandie 2014

Airborne Soldiers from around the world gathered in Normandy, France last month for the Anniversary of the Allied airborne drops that spearheaded the invasion on that “longest day” 70 years ago.  Rangers travelled to Normandy and jumped from a Dakota onto the sacred ground of Normandy’s drop zones…

In this video we see some of the 68 Swedish Army Para Rangers, age 23 to 64, doing refresher training in Sweden and then jumping in Normandy to honor the airborne soldiers who fought for freedom all those years ago.  For many of these guys, this was their first jump in more than 30-40 years.  The Dispatcher (‘Jumpmaster’ in American jargon) seen in the video is the legendary Ian Marshal – of the Pathfinder Parachute Group.

Click on the picture below to jump to the video.

Para-Rangers Normandy 2014

(hat tip to Alex Moodie)

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