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Category: Small Arms (page 1 of 40)

Colt Canada is developing a new combat rifle for the US Marine Corps?

This story has been all over Facebook the past couple of days – and it does appear to be legit!

colt-canada_0-720x459Check out the full details on All Outdoors Tech.

What does ‘AR’ stand for?

The term ‘assault rifle’ has been a politically loaded term right from the start – as the origins of the German military designation “Sturmgewehr” (assault rifle) shows.

Although its commonly repeated that the term was made up by Hitler, Peter G. Kokalis actually did thorough first-hand, primary research into it and determined that in fact the term was made up by the Officers or General in charge of the German Army’s small arms development and procurement division in order to persuade Hitler to approve the production order for the StG-44. This explains why the MP-43 was called “MP” (Maschinen Pistole – submachine gun) and even the 44 was initially called an “MP” as well, before being reclassified as the StG-44.

StG-44

(As a quick reminder, per its original specification, an ‘assault rifle’ is a carbine-sized, military rifle that fires an intermediate-sized cartridge from a detachable magazine, AND which is capable of full-automatic fire on demand. By this definition then, the German paratroops rifle, the FG-42, has become known as a ‘battle rifle’ rather than an ‘assault rifle’ becuase it fired the full-power 7.92mm Mauser cartridge. With the benefit of hindsight, the “Maschinenkarabiner” – Mkb – ‘machine carbine’ designation given to the prototype Mkb-42 would have been a more sensible term to stick with for the -44, or maybe something like ‘light automatic rifle’ for the -44 and ‘automatic battle rifle’ for full-power weapons like the FG-42. Interestingly though, the StG-44 was actually physically heavier than the FG-42.)

FG-42

FG-42

Mkb-42

Mkb-42

At any rate, Hitler had allegedly refused to authorize the production of the new MP-44 submachine-gun model becuase he saw the SMG as a defensive weapon and he believed that the Army should be focussed on attacking, not defending. So, the araments board came back with a revised production request for a new ‘assualt rifle’ that would help the German Army go back on the offensive again with greater firepower and Hitler signed off the production order for the ‘StG-44’ without any further quibbling – and the rest is history.  Sort of….

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US Army begins fielding M3 Carl Gustav Recoilless Rifle

US Army light infantry units are to be equipped with the Saab 84 mm Carl Gustaf M3 Multi-role Anti-Armor Anti-Personnel Weapon System (MAAWS) as a standard issue tactical support weapon by late 2016.

The M3 is now officially an organic weapon system within each army combat platoon, and will initially be fielded within selected Infantry Brigade Combat Teams (IBCTs), which will now train, maintain, and sustain the M3 as part of the IBCT organisational structure. Going forward, all brigade combat teams will receive 27 Carl Gustaf launchers, about one per platoon.

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The M1 Jungle Carbine is back!

Inland’s .30 caliber Jungle Carbine is a faithful replica of the original 1944 and 1945 WWII combat carbine – fitted with a military-style conical flash hider, correct military model sights, original type low wood American Walnut wood stock with fittings.

Inland Manufacturing’s new American made Jungle Carbine has the added appeal that the barrel thread is 1/2-half-inch x 28 so the flash hider may be removed to fit a (legally registered) aftermarket sound suppressor or silencer if so desired.

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KDG SIDELOK™ Trijicon MRO Mount

The Kinetic Development Group SIDELOK™ optics mount for the Trijicon MRO is now in stock!

The SIDELOK MRO mount allows the user to achieve a lower 1/3 co-witness with flip up iron sights when mounted on the AR-15 or M4 carbine.

sidelok2

This lightweight aluminum mount uses KDG’s SIDELOK (pat. Pending) cam lock system to attach to picatinny rails instantly. With no tools needed to attach the mount, the user simply rocks their setup onto the chosen mounting space, and down onto the rail.  Once pressed down, the MRO mount self-locks, and the optic can be zeroed in the usual fashion.  Removal is equally fast, and can be accomplished with one hand even while wearing gloves.

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